EnviroAnalysis Professional Courses


Courses are $650/day ($250 Students), except the 2-day Metals in the Environment course (cost: $1,000, $400 students).

Saturday, July 11 & Sunday, July 12

Course: Environmental Chemistry of Heavy Metals

Course Description

The Short Course is based on the model used successfully in 2009 at the University of Heidelberg, Germany: the lecturers invited to teach at the Short Course are recognized leaders in their fields and will provide state-of-the-art summaries of their respective disciplines.

Day 1 Topics

Metals and Health, Jerome Nriagu

Arsenic in the Environment, Chris Le

Selenium in the Environment, Dirk Wallschlaeger

Mercury in the Environment, Holger Hintelmann

Day 2 Topics

Sudbury: World Leader in Metal Contamination, Graeme Spiers

Heavy Metals and the Athabaska Bituminous Sands: Facts and Misconceptions, William Shotyk

Aerosols, Occupational Exposure, and Human Health, Bernadette Quemarais

Stable Isotopes of Heavy Metals, Michael Wieser

Who Should Take This Course

Scientists, regulators, and technologists interested in any aspect of the sources, analysis of, and distribution of heavy metals in the environment. An unprecedented lineup of top researchers will leave students with a fundamental understanding of this important topic.

Instructor Bios

Dr. Jerome O. Nriagu

Genres: Environmental Chemistry/Ecology. Career: Environment Canada, Burlington, ON, Research Scientist, 1972-93; University of Michigan, School of Public Health, Professor, 1993-2013; Professor Emeritus, 2013-; Center for Human Growth and Development, Research Professor 1997-2013; Research Professor Emeritus, 2013-; University of Waterloo, Adjunct Professor, 1985-1997.  Author/editor, over 20 books on toxic metals in the environment; Editor-in-chief, Encyclopedia of Environmental Health; Editor, Science of the Total Environment, 1983-2001, Editor-in-chief, 2002-2012. Fellow, Royal Society of Canada; Senior Fulbright Fellow, University of the West Indies. Board of Directors of many organizations.

Dr. X. Chris Le

Professor, University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair, Divisional Director; B.Sc. Chemistry (Honours), Wuhan University, 1983; M.Sc. Environmental Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1986; M.Sc. Analytical Chemistry, Brock University, 1988 and Ph.D. Environmental / Analytical Chemistry, University of British Columbia, 1993. Professor in the Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology as well as in the Department of Public Health Sciences.  Adjunct Professor in the Department of Chemistry.  Current research activities include the following: development of novel assays for molecules of environmental and biological significance, using affinity capillary electrophoresis, laser-induced fluorescence, immunoassay, chromatography, and atomic and mass spectrometry; biomonitoring and exposure assessment of trace elements; exposure, metabolism, and health effects of arsenic; DNA damage and protein adducts as biomarkers of cancer etiology and treatment. 

Dr. Dirk Wallschläger

Director - Water Quality Centre, Professor - Environmental and Resource Studies/Chemistry, Trent University.  Research is primarily on the speciation of anion-forming trace metal(loid)s in natural environments and in industrial waste streams. He has developed analytical methods for the speciation of such elements, particularly arsenic, selenium and chromium in liquids and solids using ion chromatography coupled to inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (IC-ICP-MS). He then applies these methods to study the cycling, transformation and fate of these elements in natural and industrial systems.  In the environment, the generated data are used to study geochemical transport processes and assess the risk arising from existing contaminations. In industrial waste streams, he uses these approaches to design and control custom-tailored treatment strategies.

Dr. Holger Hintelmann

Dean of Arts & Science - Science, Professor of Chemistry and Environmental & Resource Science, Trent University.  B.Sc., 1989, University of Hamburg, Germany; Ph.D., 1993, University of Hamburg, Germany.  Dr. Hintelmann's research focuses on the speciation and fate of metals in the environment. His group is exploring the use of stable isotopes to unravel the biogeochemical cycling of mercury employing ICP/MS techniques. Currently, he is involved in a number of field studies, covering diverse ecosystems from the Arctic to the Amazon, including whole ecosystem experiments such as METAALICUS and wetland restoration projects in the San Francisco Bay area. He recently started to investigate the fractionation of heavy elements in the environment, whereby the determination of Hg isotope fingerprints holds great potential to track mercury from pollution sources to environmental receptor sites. 

Dr. Graeme A. Spiers

Chair in Environmental Monitoring and Professor, School of the Environment and Director Elliot Lake Research Field Station, Laurentian University.  B.Sc. (Waikato), M.Sc. (Alberta),Ph.D. (Alberta).

Dr. William Shotyk

William Shotyk is a scientist, born in the Village of Swansea, now part of the City of Toronto. He received his B.Sc. (Agr.) in Soil Science and Chemistry from the University of Guelph and a Ph.D. in Geology from the University of Western Ontario. Following postdoctoral research at the University of California, Riverside and UWO, he worked at the University of Berne in Switzerland where he completed a Habilitation in Geochemistry, in 1995. He became Professor at the University of Heidelberg in Germany, and Director of the Institute of Environmental Geochemistry, in October of 2000. He joined the Department of Renewable Resources at the University of Alberta in October of 2011, as the Bocock Chair in Agriculture and the Environment. He helped to create the new ultraclean, metal-free SWAMP lab for studying trace elements in soils, water, air, manures, and plants. He has published more than 190 articles, including 145 in refereed journals. In 2013, he was awarded the Philippe Duchaufour Medal for Soil System Science by the European Geoscience Union. He is the founder and President of the Elmvale Foundation, a federally registered charity for environmental education which hosts the annual Elmvale Water Festival. Over the past 40 years, with the help of family and friends, he has planted 25,000 trees (more than 50 species) on his family farm property near Elmvale, Ontario.

Dr. Bernadette Quemarais

Associate Professor, Division of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta.  Degree in Food Engineering from University of Dijon in 1985, PhD in Molecular Chemistry from University of Nantes in 1988.  Post-doctoral fellowship in Geochemistry at University of Quebec in Montreal, in 1989. She then worked 6 years for the St. Lawrence Centre (Environment Canada, Montreal) where she specialized in the transport of contaminants in the St. Lawrence River. During her work at the St. Lawrence Centre, she focused on trace analysis of mercury in water and she installed the trace mercury laboratory. The latter is presently used as the reference laboratory for mercury analysis in water at Environment Canada. In 2001, she joined the Canadian Forces and became a Bioscience Officer. She completed her Master in Occupational and Environmental Health at University of Toronto in 2006. Dr. Quémerais stayed in the military for over 9 years, during which she mainly worked as an Occupational Hygienist at Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) Toronto. In particular, she participated in work with DRDC Valcartier to assess the exposure of artillery soldiers to atmospheric emissions during live gun firing. In addition, she was in charge in projects including divers' exposure to contaminated water, and noise exposure in Seaking helicopters. Dr. Quémerais has also worked as a consultant and chemist for private companies. Dr. Quémerais joined the University of Alberta in May 2012.  Her primary focus is in exposure to nanoparticles at the workplace, in particular exposure to welding fumes.

Dr. Michael Wieser

Associate Professor, Undergraduate Program Director, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Science, University of Calgary. Research Interests: Applications of Isotopes as Environmental Tracers; High Accuracy Measurement of Isotope Abundance and Atomic Weight; Metals in Living Systems; Thermal Ionization and Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry.

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Sunday, July 12

Course: New Techniques and Approaches for Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Environmental Samples

Frank L. Dorman1,2 and Jack W. Cochran2,3

  1. Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 107 Althouse Laboratories, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802
  2. Forensic Science Program, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802
  3. Restek Corporation, 110 Benner Circle, Bellefonte, PA 16823

Course Description

This course will cover the latest trends and developments for effectively utilizing and optimizing gas chromatographic techniques as applied to the analysis of environmental samples.  Specific focus will be towards new sample preparation techniques, inlet system operation, column selection and detectors that allow for significant improvements relative to the more common techniques which have been in use for several years. While this course will briefly address the scientific fundamentals, more time will be spent on practical applications and also optimization techniques that allow for significant improvements in data quality and robustness.

Course Syllabus

  1. Novel Sample Preparation - QuEChERS
    1. QuEChERS Introduction
    2. Using QuEChERS for PAHs in seafood
    3. Using QuEChERS for incurred pesticides analysis
    4. Summary and challenges of this technique
  2. Inlet Systems
    1. Liner geometry and surface chemistry selection
    2. Splitless injection optimization
    3. Split injection – Can we really use this for trace-level environmental work? What are the advantages?
    4. Concurrent Solvent Recondensation - Large Volume Splitless Injection
  3. Column Technology
    1. Column selection for target versus discovery analysis
    2. Alternative carrier gases
    3. Efficiency-optimized flow and speed-optimized flow
    4. Multidimensional separations
  4. Detector advancements
    1. MS/MS versus HRMS
    2. APGC ionization mass spectrometry
    3. High-resolution time-of-flight systems

Summary and Q&A

Who Should Take This Course

This course is intended as a more advanced topics course, and is best suited to current users of GC and GC-MS with at least two years of experience, and is not intended to be an introduction to either GC or environmental analysis.  The course instructors have a combined 50+ years of practical experience and education in chromatographic separations, mass spectrometry and environmental analysis. Attendees are encouraged to bring questions of their own which may be addressed in the course or in the Q&A sessions.

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Thursday, July 16

Course: Environmental Sampling

Professor Michael E. Ketterer, Metropolitan State University of Denver, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Denver, CO 80217  USA

Course Description

This course will present theoretical and practical information about the process of environmental sampling.  We will first consider how to formulate a question or hypothesis around which sampling campaigns are formulated.  The importance of "defining a target population" will be addressed.  For particulate solids, we will briefly present and discuss the implication of Pierre Gy's sampling theory as it applies to one-, two- and three-dimensional target populations.  The significance of compositional and distributional heterogeneity will be detailed.  The processes of composite and grab sampling will be contrasted.  Different sampling strategies, including random, stratified random, systematic, and judgmental sampling, will be briefly described.  Practical guidelines will be given on numbers of increments to collect, what mass will be required, and how to approach particle size reduction.  Focusing on sampling of soils, sediments, and natural waters, a range of different case studies will be presented; the audience is encouraged to bring their own examples for discussion.

Instructor Bio

:Slide1.jpg Michael E. Ketterer obtained his primary and secondary education in Buffalo, NY, and received a B.S. in Chemistry from University of Notre Dame in 1980.  He pursued graduate studies in electron transfer and interfacial chemistry at the University of Colorado under the direction of Prof. Carl A. Koval, receiving a Ph.D. in 1985.  After brief employment as an industrial electrochemist, he worked from 1987-1993 at the US Environmental Protection Agency's forensic laboratory, and was Assistant Professor at John Carroll University from 1993-1998.  In 1998 Mike moved to Northern Arizona University, where he was Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry until 2013.  From July 2013 to present, he has been Professor and Department Chair of Chemistry at Metropolitan State University of Denver. His current research interests are in environmental geochemistry and environmental radioactivity, and he has a focus on using mass spectrometry in studies of long-lived actinides in the environment.  Mike has traveled and lectured extensively about his work, and has served as a consultant for many different private companies, Government agencies, and law firms; he has served as an expert witness in numerous civil and criminal cases. As a result of growing up "across the river" from Canada, Mike also learned to ice skate at age 6, and is an enthusiastic but non-partisan hockey fan with mixed loyalties. 

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Thursday, July 16

Course: Effective Determination of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) by Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Techniques

Dr. Don Patterson, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Ret.) and Dr. Eric J Reiner, Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change

Course Description

The course will cover all aspects of the analysis of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) including the Stockholm POPs, emerging POPs and tools and procedures that can be used to identify unknown POPs and interfering compounds. Each step of the analysis will be reviewed and important elements required to obtain optimum conditions for analysis in order to produce the best quality data with respect to sensitivity, selectivity, speed and cost. Examples will be illustrated by reference to accredited methods of the Ontario Ministry of the Environment and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Course Syllabus

  • Background on POPs, Emerging POPs and other Toxic Organics
  • Sampling and Laboratory Infrastructure Requirements
  • Preparing Samples for GC/MS Determination (choice and optimization of extraction methods; automated preparation methods)
  • Optimizing Speed and Efficiency of Chromatographic Separations
    • Choice of Detection Systems (high resolution mass spectrometry,
  • tandem mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography/tandem MS)
  • Method Validation steps
  • Quality Assurance/Quality Control (Method development/validation, analyst
    • training and proficiency, uncertainty, accreditation /ISO 17025)
  • Tips and Tricks for Optimized Analysis
  • Advanced techniques and procedures
    • Multidimensional chromatography, Ultra-high resolution mass

spectrometry, automation.

Who Should Take This Course?

This course is for analyst, and lab manager with all levels of experience.  The course will focus on key aspects of POPs analysis to ensure the production of first quality results ensuring participants have the information to develop and/or enhance their own methods.  This valuable information is a result of the over combined 70 year experience of the instructors.

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Thursday, July 16

Course: Microwave Enhanced Chemistry Including Sample Preparation for Ultra-Trace Bioanalytical, Speciation, and Accurate Analysis

Professor H.M. (Skip) Kingston and Mr. Matt Pamuku1 (CEO)

Duquesne University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Pittsburgh PA 15282

1Applied Isotope Technologies, 2403 Sidney St. Pittsburgh PA 15203

Course Description

This course presents fundamental theoretical non-intuitive relationships and scientific basis for microwave-enhanced chemistry and selected applications in microwave sample preparation. Practical applications include closed vessel elevated temperature and pressure acid dissolution for elemental analysis, solvent extraction for elemental and molecular speciation, ultra-trace clean chemistry, elemental analysis and species analysis. Specific sample preparation and application for ICP-MS and GC-MS and ESI-TOF-MS (ESI-QQQ, ESI-TRAP, Nano ESI MS) and other mass spectrometric analyses are discussed. The discussions includes fundamental relationships of analyte recovery, power, reagent temperature, temperature control and feedback control, pressure, matrices, chemical compatibility, and practical standard methods also will be discussed. Basic features of microwave decomposition and extraction methods, equipment, vessel design, and accessories will be covered. EPA Methods included for transfer of procedures between equipment are discussed, and applied methods such as methods 3052, 3200, 3051a, 3015a, 3546, 3030K, and others methods developed for EPA (RCRA SW-846, and other programs), ASTM, NCCLS, SEMI and other standards bodies and organizations. Clean Chemistry and ultra trace lowering the analytical blank though microwave enhanced chemistry will be demonstrated.

Instructor Bios

H.M. (Skip) Kingston is Professor of Analytical Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, PA. He is the author of the EPA methods 6800, 3052 and 15 other standard methods and a participant in the validation of many speciated methods for environmental Human Health and Exposomics. From 1976 to 1991 he was a Supervisory Research Chemist and Program Director in the Analytical Research Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) where he was also the Director of the Consortium on Automated Analytical Laboratory Systems (CAALS). Professor Kingston is actively involved in projects that aim to advance speciation, analytical automated analysis, microwave enhanced chemistry and applied analysis of environmental factors affecting human health. He co-authored two landmark professional reference books for the American Chemical Society (ACS) entitled Microwave-Enhanced Chemistry: Fundamentals, Sample Preparation and Applications, and Introduction to Microwave Sample Preparation: Theory and Practice. Professor Kingston has received numerous awards for his inventions. Among them are three R&D-100 awards in three separate fields: the 1996 Award for development of Speciated Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (SIDMS), and 1989 Award for the invention of chelation ion chromatography and 1987 award for the development of the microwave-enhanced chemistry. He holds a dozen patents in the SIDMS field, mass spectrometry automation, microwave-enhanced chemistry, and others pending. He remains interested in the creation, development and automation of analytical/bioanalytical analysis methods using enriched isotope mass spectrometry.

Matt Pamuku – CEO of Applied Isotope Technologies is a bioanalytical chemist and a specialist in technology and analytical/synthesis instrument development. After spending 8 years managing protein chemistry laboratory and Massachusetts General Hospital, he established and managed a state-of-the-art molecular structure analysis laboratory at Harvard Medical School. Joining the industry, Matt spent seven years with Beckman instruments initially as an international representative. He was in China before the Chinese government opened its borders to the West. Later, he managed development and marketing of protein/peptide analysis and synthesis products for Beckman. This was followed by management of technology and analytical systems development at Applied Biosystems where the first gas-phase peptide sequencer and multi-vessel solid phase peptide synthesizers became indispensable tools in the early years of biotechnology industry. His other accomplishments include the development of the first kinetic microplate reader and first light, non-corroding and longer-lasting carbon fiber centrifuge rotors. Since co-founding Applied Isotope Technologies in 2003, Matt has been spending all his energies in the development of advanced isotopic metrology and analytical tools for the mass spectrometers in collaboration with Prof. Skip Kingston and scientists in his group.

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Thursday, July 16

Course: Fundamentals of Quadrupole ICP-MS and ICP-MS/MS

Pamela Wee, Agilent Technologies

Course Description

The essentials of quadrupole ICP-MS encompassing the practice and fundamental understanding of how ICP-MS works will be covered. Examples will be presented for the successful implementation of methods that are fit for purpose. Strategies to mitigate common issues and to troubleshoot equipment and data will be discussed throughout the course.

Topics covered: The Basis of ICP-MS, Sample Introduction System, Plasma Source, Interface, Ion Optics, Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer, Detection, QQQ ICP-MS, Sources of Uncertainty and Determinate Errors, Management of Spectral and Non-Spectral Interferences, Figures-of-Merit, data interpretation, methods development, quality control, and analytical efficiencies.

Who Should Take This Course

Analysts with skills at the beginner and intermediate levels seeking to improve their understanding and efficiencies in ICP-MS will benefit from this course. In-depth concepts will be explained in layperson's terms.

Instructor Bio

Pam graduated from the University of Toronto, Canada with a M.Sc.  and brings 30 years of work experience in atomic spectrometry spanning ICP-MS, ICP-OES, FAAS, GFAAS, hydride and CVAAS, sample preparation, and analytical statistics. She has worked for the Ontario Ministry of the Environment, contract analytical testing laboratories, academia, and manufacturers of atomic spectrometers. Her roles included methods and product development, write-up and implementation of methods and QC protocols, technical support, teaching, and speaker at conferences and seminars. Currently, Pam works as an applications scientist in ICP-MS and ICP-MS/MS at Agilent Technologies Canada Inc.

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Friday, July 17

Course: EPA Method 6800 Direct Speciated Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry and Direct Speciated IDMS

Professor H.M. (Skip) Kingston and Mr. Matt Pamuku1 (CEO)

Duquesne University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Pittsburgh PA 15282

1Applied Isotope Technologies, 2403 Sidney St. Pittsburgh PA 15203

Course Description

Among the advanced technologies recently promulgated under the U.S. Federal Government by the US EPA, Department of Defense, Centers of Disease Control and other government agencies is the  EPA Method 6800 "Elemental and Molecular Speciated Isotope Dilution (Update V, 2013 and 2015)." Method 6800 includes D-IDMS or Direct Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry for single analyte and Direct Speciated IDMS for multiple inorganic and organic species, toxins, analytes of forensics interest. Fundamentals of this advanced technique and data will be provided and discussed. Applications of these measurements are expanding into exposomics studies that aim to understand the role of environment exposure as disease triggers.  Species such as Cr(VI), Hg2+ and CH3Hg+, Glutathione Ratios (GSH/GSSG in the immune system), organic toxins such as pesticides, plasticizers including many of the Stockholm Convention toxins are covered both within the environmental and exposomics perspectives.  Applications of D-ID using IC-ICP-MS, Solid Phase Extraction thermal desorption GC-MS and LC-QQQ mass spectrometers will be demonstrated. The latest version of the EPA Method 6800 is being uploaded to the EPA website for international adoption in May-June 2015. 

Instructor Bios

H.M. (Skip) Kingston is Professor of Analytical Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, PA. He is the author of the EPA methods 6800, 3052 and 15 other standard methods and a participant in the validation of many speciated methods for environmental Human Health and Exposomics. From 1976 to 1991 he was a Supervisory Research Chemist and Program Director in the Analytical Research Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) where he was also the Director of the Consortium on Automated Analytical Laboratory Systems (CAALS). Professor Kingston is actively involved in projects that aim to advance speciation, analytical automated analysis, microwave enhanced chemistry and applied analysis of environmental factors affecting human health. He co-authored two landmark professional reference books for the American Chemical Society (ACS) entitled Microwave-Enhanced Chemistry: Fundamentals, Sample Preparation and Applications, and Introduction to Microwave Sample Preparation: Theory and Practice. Professor Kingston has received numerous awards for his inventions. Among them are three R&D-100 awards in three separate fields: the 1996 Award for development of Speciated Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (SIDMS), and 1989 Award for the invention of chelation ion chromatography and 1987 award for the development of the microwave-enhanced chemistry. He holds a dozen patents in the SIDMS field, mass spectrometry automation, microwave-enhanced chemistry, and others pending. He remains interested in the creation, development and automation of analytical/bioanalytical analysis methods using enriched isotope mass spectrometry.

Matt Pamuku – CEO of Applied Isotope Technologies is a bioanalytical chemist and a specialist in technology and analytical/synthesis instrument development. After spending 8 years managing protein chemistry laboratory and Massachusetts General Hospital, he established and managed a state-of-the-art molecular structure analysis laboratory at Harvard Medical School. Joining the industry, Matt spent seven years with Beckman instruments initially as an international representative. He was in China before the Chinese government opened its borders to the West. Later, he managed development and marketing of protein/peptide analysis and synthesis products for Beckman. This was followed by management of technology and analytical systems development at Applied Biosystems where the first gas-phase peptide sequencer and multi-vessel solid phase peptide synthesizers became indispensable tools in the early years of biotechnology industry. His other accomplishments include the development of the first kinetic microplate reader and first light, non-corroding and longer-lasting carbon fiber centrifuge rotors. Since co-founding Applied Isotope Technologies in 2003, Matt has been spending all his energies in the development of advanced isotopic metrology and analytical tools for the mass spectrometers in collaboration with Prof. Skip Kingston and scientists in his group.

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Friday, July 17

Course: Environmental Forensics

Professor Michael E. Ketterer, Metropolitan State University of Denver, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Denver, CO 80217  USA

Course Description

This course will explain and clarify the distinctions between environmental forensics and conventional environmental site investigations.  Forensics studies are concerned with questions of why/when/who contamination originates from vs. the conventional site investigations focused on matters of what/how/much/where contamination exists.  Major topics to be addressed in this course include:  A) why forensic studies require a different mindset; B) understanding "background" levels of a constituent; C) sources and sample collection considerations; D) transport and fate of constituents; E) micromineralogy; F) isotope tracing methods; G) multivariate data analysis approaches; and H) case studies.  Attendees will be encouraged to present/discuss problems of concern in their own work with the instructor and enrollees.

Instructor Bio

:Slide1.jpg Michael E. Ketterer obtained his primary and secondary education in Buffalo, NY, and received a B.S. in Chemistry from University of Notre Dame in 1980.  He pursued graduate studies in electron transfer and interfacial chemistry at the University of Colorado under the direction of Prof. Carl A. Koval, receiving a Ph.D. in 1985.  After brief employment as an industrial electrochemist, he worked from 1987-1993 at the US Environmental Protection Agency's forensic laboratory, and was Assistant Professor at John Carroll University from 1993-1998.  In 1998 Mike moved to Northern Arizona University, where he was Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry until 2013.  From July 2013 to present, he has been Professor and Department Chair of Chemistry at Metropolitan State University of Denver. His current research interests are in environmental geochemistry and environmental radioactivity, and he has a focus on using mass spectrometry in studies of long-lived actinides in the environment. Mike has traveled and lectured extensively about his work, and has served as a consultant for many different private companies, Government agencies, and law firms; he has served as an expert witness in numerous civil and criminal cases. As a result of growing up "across the river" from Canada, Mike also learned to ice skate at age 6, and is an enthusiastic but non-partisan hockey fan with mixed loyalties. 

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Friday, July 17

Course: Taking Your Analysis To A Higher Resolution

Peter Stow, Isomass Scientific Inc.

Course Description

These days quadrupole ICP-MS has become a ubiquitous analysis technique for both solution and laser ablation analysis. However for the greatest sensitivity and lowest LOD's the quadrupole ICP-MS cannot match the magnetic sector ICP-MS.  This course compares the two instrument types, their similarities and their differences. The advantages of the magnetic sector instrument are highlighted.

Who Should Take This Course

Instructor Bio

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Friday, July 17

Course: Measuring Trace Metals At The Ultra- Low Concentrations Found In Natural Freshwaters: Facts and Artefacts

William Shotyk, University of Alberta

Course Description

INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND

1. Metal-free clean lab environment: justification, theory, design and practice. Successful, sequential air filtration strategies for the establishment of clean labs for reagent preparation, analysis, and sample handling.

2. Clean water and acids. Suitable plasticware and cleaning procedures. Sample handling. Trace and ultra-trace concentrations in perspective: the need to go "low". Development of "clean intelligence".

3. Measurement of trace metals using ICP-Sector Field MS (ICP-MS). Integration into the clean lab environment. Sample introduction, calibration, reference materials, mass resolution. Measuring Pb isotope ratios.

APPLICATIONS

4. Polar snow and ice cores. Coring, decontamination, sample handling. Effects of global climate change and atmospheric pollution on "average abundance" of trace metals. The special case of Sc and its use as a reference element. Enrichment factors, Pb isotope ratios, and the antiquity of global metal pollution. Snow pit sampling and seasonal variations in pollution sources to the Arctic.

5. Surface waters. Designing an analytical strategy for water samples from streams and lakes. The importance of particulate material. Total versus dissolved concentrations of trace metals: importance of ionic potential. Tracing the sources of atmospheric and aquatic Pb contamination using Pb isotope ratios. Case study: the Athabasca River.

6. Groundwaters. Conventional sampling approaches: strengths and weaknesses. Particles, colloids, filtration and filter blank values.  Design of a dedicated groundwater sampling station for the study of an artesian flow system in Springwater Township, Ontario: The Elmvale Groundwater Observatory. Comparison of water samples from wells in stainless steel versus HDPE.

7. Bottled water. Worldwide survey of trace elements in bottled waters; comparison with groundwaters. Effects of packaging: leaching of Sb from PET, leaching of As, Pb, Th and Zn from glass.

8. Sediment pore water. Obtaining pore waters using in situ sampling.

Who Should Take This Course

For anybody seriously interested in the accurate and precise determination of trace elements in water and their significance, the "clean lab" methods developed for studies of polar ice cores are absolutely necessary. This course is designed from the perspective of both earth and environmental sciences for beginners to advanced specialists. Analytical chemists, lab managers, quality control personnel, aquatic chemists, hydrogeologists and toxicologists will be presented with some of the most recent advances and developments in ultratrace analysis.

Instructor Bio

William Shotyk is a scientist, born in the Village of Swansea, now part of the City of Toronto. He received his B.Sc. (Agr.) in Soil Science and Chemistry from the University of Guelph and a Ph.D. in Geology from the University of Western Ontario. Following postdoctoral research at the University of California, Riverside and UWO, he worked at the University of Berne in Switzerland where he completed a Habilitation in Geochemistry, in 1995. He became Professor at the University of Heidelberg in Germany, and Director of the Institute of Environmental Geochemistry, in October of 2000. He joined the Department of Renewable Resources at the University of Alberta in October of 2011, as the Bocock Chair in Agriculture and the Environment. He helped to create the new ultraclean, metal-free SWAMP lab for studying trace elements in soils, water, air, manures, and plants. He has published more than 190 articles, including 145 in refereed journals. In 2013, he was awarded the Philippe Duchaufour Medal for Soil System Science by the European Geoscience Union. He is the founder and President of the Elmvale Foundation, a federally registered charity for environmental education which hosts the annual Elmvale Water Festival. Over the past 40 years, with the help of family and friends, he has planted 25,000 trees (more than 50 species) on his family farm property near Elmvale, Ontario.

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EnviroAnalysis

conference dates: July 13-15, 2015

EnviroAnalysis 2015